“When pages utilize scripting languages to display content, or to create interface elements, the information provided by the script shall be identified with functional text that can be read by assistive technology. – §1194.22(l)

Why it matters

As in HTML, almost anything is possible in PDF using JavaScript.

Unlike, HTML, however, PDF JavaScript is usually employed for relatively mundane purposes.

EXAMPLE: A MouseOn event exposes a button, however there’s no keyboard equivalent means of exposing the button.
RESOLUTION: The preferred solution is to avoid exposing content based on user actions. If necessary, ensure your script supports keyboard navigation in addition to mouse events.

While writing JavaScript for PDF files, the same basic rules of accessibility apply to the PDF context as they do in HTML.

What happens when I verify this Checkpoint?

This checkpoint prompts the user for a pass, fail or Not Applicable judgment for each page containing scripts. Each page that does not contain scripts is assigned a status of Not Applicable to any document pages that do not contain scripts.

When to Pass or Fail this Checkpoint?

PassThe information provided by the script is delivered in functional text that can be read by assistive technology.
FailThe information provided by the script is not delivered in with functional text that can be read by assistive technology.
Not ApplicableThe scripts do not affect the accessibility of the page.
RemediationTypically, return to the author for improved scripting that includes advisory dialogs and other accessibility features.

 

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